Are You Ready for More Eighties? #NewBook @MyEighties

The phrase “Creativity Breeds Creativity” is often bandied about. However, shortly after starting the interviews with songwriters and musicians for my latest book ‘More Eighties’, I began to realise the truth behind the statement. My aim in writing the book was to explore how the Eighties worked as a backdrop for artists, and examine how the decade that encouraged individuality, and saw huge technological, political and social change, impacted on their creativity. Their recollections were humorous, touching, entertaining and thought-provoking, but more than that, they were inspirational.

Listening to Fairground Attraction’s Eddi Reader, a woman with one of the most beautiful voices I have heard live, describe the terror she felt when performing proved to me that self-doubt does not discriminate by talent. Her telling of the hilarious incident which led her to actively challenge any negative thoughts will not only have you crying with laughter, but make you consider how your own thought processes affect your actions. Her journey from Glasgow’s tenements to top of the charts is one which highlights how artistry cannot be ignored, even when the artist may be their own worst critic.

‘More Eighties’ features interviews with those at the forefront of popular culture during the era, and includes a range of contributors as diverse as the decade itself. The electro sound synonymous with the decade is discussed with synth pioneers Martyn Ware (Human League and Heaven 17) and Dave Ball (Soft Cell), along with the changes that have taken place over the last forty years in music and in wider society. Issues including multiculturalism and racism form part of the conversation with Dave Wakeling (The Beat), Pauline Black (The Selecter) and Junior Giscombe, while Rusty Egan (Visage) discusses the manifestation of creativity in the UK’s nightclubs in the form of both music and fashion. I was also fortunate enough to talk to Suzi Quatro, Ian Donaldson (H2O), Nathan Moore (Brother Beyond), Karel Fialka, Jona Lewie, and The Lotus Eaters’ Peter Coyle about their memories and insights.

Dave Wakeling and Peter Coyle were incredibly generous in sharing their creative processes with me, sending me some of their unfinished material to listen to, followed by the completed tracks. Not only was it a privilege to be entrusted with those early pieces of music and to have my opinion valued, but it helped me further understand what we had spoken about in our interviews and, I hope, better relay those discussions in my writing. As I said, creativity breeds creativity. Being involved in those songs from the early stages and seeing them develop into the wonderful final recordings was really a ‘lightbulb moment’ for me. I realised that even those artists I had listened to since I was 12 experienced the same frustrations, doubts and eventual pleasure I do when writing. The key was harnessing creative flow when it came. That realisation freed up my writing immensely, and I even found myself writing poetry again, something I had not done so prolifically for about 25 years.

You may well now understand why ‘More Eighties’ is, for me, the best book I have published. It achieved everything I had set out to do, in examining how the decade facilitated a huge surge of creativity, but it also allowed me to rediscover the joy of submitting to my own creative driving force. It is something I shall endeavour to hold onto in future when facing some of the more onerous aspects of writing, such as transcribing interviews (despite what some may think, I actually can’t bear to hear the sound of my own voice!). I hope when readers have finished the book, they will have also found inspiration, as well as nostalgia and entertainment, in its pages.

You can buy More Eighties here.

 

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